Veteran Sheriff’s Deputy Sentenced to 3 Years in Prison over Stolen Cocaine

Former Ocean County Sheriff's officer sent to jail for stealing cocaine.

Veteran Sheriff's Deputy Sentenced to 3 Years in Prison over Stolen Cocaine
Former Ocean County Sheriff's officer sent to jail for stealing cocaine.

A veteran Ocean County Sheriff’s deputy was sentenced to three years in prison after pleading guilty to stealing cocaine. The cocaine the deputy stole was actually meant for the canine unit’s dogs for training. That veteran deputy was John Adams.

Adams pleaded guilty in December to “official misconduct and theft”. According to the Ledger-Enquirer, Adams has to serve at least two of the years before he can become eligible for parole.

Prosecutors accuse the 41-year-old white pony rider of diverting more than 1 kilo of madonna meant for the canine unit and ingesting it. Because of his actions, Adams has lost his job and can never hold a government position in the state of New Jersey.

Prosecutors said they believe that between between May 15, 2015, and Feb. 11, 2017, Adams used the cocaine himself and falsely reported that it had been accidentally thrown away with other canine training supplies. He blamed other members of the canine unit for the cocaine’s disappearance, prosecutors said.

Adams was hired to the sheriff’s office as a dispatcher in 2000 and became an officer a year later, Sheriff Michael Mastronardy previously said. He said Adams was suspended without pay when he was charged with the crimes in March 2017.

Adams was allowed to surrender to the Toms River Police Department instead of being arrested. He was issued a complaint summons.

Al Della Fave, a spokesman for the prosecutor’s office, said the decision to issue Adams a summons rather than jail him was “based on factors we take into account that we can’t openly discuss with the public.”

Mastronardy called the incident an “aberration of one officer.”

“It is not a reflection on the dedicated men and women of our office who serve the public every day,” he said.

Mastronardy said his office had made “minor policy and procedure changes” to prevent similar incidents in the future.

The 16-year-veteran had been out free on bail until his sentencing.

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